Refreshing Citrus Earl Grey Iced Tea

Its no secret that my favourite tea in the history of tea, is Earl Grey.

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My Mum always has a box of it hand just for when my sister and I go to visit, I rave about it so much, I’ve been known to inspire others to venture into the world of Earl Grey tea (especially French Earl Grey) and I’ve got some friends that keep a box handy for when I pop by. My purse constantly has a strong scent of bergamot because I insist on carting bags of earl grey around, just in case, and most birthdays and Christmases I’m given some variation of T2’s French Earl Grey products (my special occasion tea). Earl Grey tea is my jam! (so to speak) Continue reading

Speedy Satay Salad

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I’ve just got a quick recipe for you today, and by request, too! You may have seen me post this beautiful salad for one of my lunches last week, and as with most of the meals I eat, I put it together in the spur of the moment with the food that I had available and a craving on my mind. That craving was satay, and the inspiration came from a gorgeously green stir fry I had a few years ago at a place called Vegie Bar in Fitzroy (Melbourne).

Continue reading

Miranda’s Famous Chicken Soup

Chicken soup 1

With all these frosty nights lately, there is nothing better than a chicken soup to warm up your body (and your heart). My chicken soup recipe has been highly requested, by friends, housemates and some of you out there in cyberspace, so it is without further ado that I share said recipe here.

The thing with this recipe is that it has slowly evolved over time to become the gorgeous masterpiece that it is. When I make it, I use my own chicken broth (or stock) and usually put in chicken from the whole chicken I roast the night before. Continue reading

Kimchi & Pumpkin Pancake

Does anyone else like Kimchi and Korean food as much as I do? To be honest, I think it might be my obsession with Eat Your Kimchi and their FAPFAP (Food Adventure Program for Awesome People) videos – they are Simon and Martina, two Canadians that live in South Korea and have many K-Pop related videos but their food videos I how I found and fell in love with them. Their videos inspired me to try Korean food a couple of years ago and now, if I have the opportunity to eat Korean, I will always take it – it’s delicious!

Anyway, there is a fabulous Korean restaurant in West End with a lovely owner who gave us marshmallows on skewers to toast in the mini fire pit at the table (so cute). It’s called Hong Depot, and this recipe is an ode to their delicious Kimchi pancake.

While this is more of an omelette than a pancake – it is grain free – it is very tasty and quick to prepare. Continue reading

Tea Fiend: Miranda’s Tea Guide – Ginger Tea

If you follow me on Instagram or Facebook, you’ve probably noticed that I really really (REALLY) love tea. I love a hot cup of earl grey on a cold and slow morning, I love a bubbly and naturally sweet iced tea in the summer time, I love collecting new flavours and I even bathe in the stuff! But the thing I love most about tea is discovering the medicinal properties of the different herbs – meaning that you can drink specific teas to help your body do its thing!

From time to time, I’d like to explore with you these medicinal properties (goodness knows I need another reason to drink more tea, don’t I?) in my Tea Fiend series. Just remember, if you are going to explore these options, best to opt for organic tea (I’d be happy to give you a guide to my favourite brands within this series – just ask!), and don’t be afraid to try a pre-made blend (it will only taste better that way) or even experiment in blending stand-alone herbs that you like (you never know what you will come up with).

Ginger Tea (Zingiber officinale)

(caffeine free)

Ginger is a gorgeous herb to drink in tea form – it’s got a sweetness and heat to it that can be matched easily with a variety of other teas, but on its own, it has fantastic medicinal properties.

For starters, the natural heat within ginger makes it a perfect natural winter warmer! If you get cold hands and toes, ginger is a fantastic herbal tea to drink throughout the day as it gets the blood flowing to really warm you from your head to your toes. This action of stimulating the blood flow can also stimulate the blood flow to your organs, such as those in your digestive system, to stimulate their function. The organs need an adequate blood supply in order to function properly, so stimulating the blood flow in your body can optimise the delivery of nutrients and removal of wastes to better the performance of your organs.

Ginger also benefits the digestive system by reducing nausea, (a safe and effective treatment for nausea in pregnancy) and motion sickness, and can reduce bloating by aiding the breakdown of food due to active digestive enzymes within the ginger. Drink some ginger tea in anticipation of motion sickness if it’s something you know you’re prone to, or as symptoms arise. If you’ve over eaten or haven’t properly chewed your food, or regularly feel bloated just below your rib cage (your stomach area), sipping ginger tea may be a beneficial remedy for you. It also stimulates digestive secretions required to breakdown food and as such has been shown to reduce reflux, flatulence and colic, as well as stimulate the appetite. To stimulate your appetite, brew yourself a cup 30 minutes before meals to gently get your digestive juices flowing, not only will you have an appetite, but you will be more able to breakdown and absorb those all-important nutrients I keep bangin on about!

Ginger is a natural anti-inflammatory food, meaning that it can be used to reduce the pain associated with common ailments, like period pain, headache, muscle pain and migraine. These conditions are associated with an overproduction of pro-inflammatory chemicals called prostaglandins, which over-stimulate the natural inflammatory processes within the body, causing unnecessary damage to nearby tissues, and pain. Sipping on a brew with ginger in it throughout the day, may be of benefit.

[While ginger tea is a helpful tool for such conditions, an anti-inflammatory diet will have a more potent effect ('Ask Mira' at mirandaswellness@outlook.com or www.facebook.com/MirandasWellness if you'd like more info)]

The anti-inflammatory effect of ginger is also helpful during cold and flu, while the immune-boosting effects of ginger can help your body to fight off infections.

How to Brew

Infuse 4-6 fresh slices of ginger, or 3-9g dried ginger root in boiling water for 30 minutes and sip throughout the day. Best not to consume more than these amounts in one day.

Combinations

For nausea:

Brew a pot of 4-6 slices ginger with 1/4-1/2 cup fresh peppermint (or 3-9g dried ginger/6-12g dried peppermint), as both herbs are great for nausea. ***If prone to reflux however, leave out the peppermint as it will exacerbate symptoms***

For bloating/flatulence:

When feeling bloated after a meal or experiencing flatulence, a brew of 4-6 slices ginger and 1-2tsp chamomile can help the digestion of your food and to relieve the discomfort of bloating and flatulence

For inflammation:

Brew a ginger and turmeric chai tea, such as this gorgeous one from Reece Carter Naturopathy for relief within 30 minutes

For cold & flu:

Ginger slices, lemon slices, a sprig or two of thyme and a teaspoon of the strongest manuka honey you can buy (the bigger the number, the stronger it is) is a strong brew to boost your immune system and help to kill off microbes that are making you sick in the first place. The stronger the better for this tea, and best if sipped throughout the day. It may not be the most pleasant tea you’ve brewed, but it will definitely pack the punch you are after.

Thanks to Lyndal Martin from Life Loves Me Naturopathy, who was my resident herb-nerd for this piece.

Omnomnomelette

The last few weeks for me have been somewhat of a rollercoaster, both emotionally and physically, but through my gorgeous friends (especially my nat/nuts who totally GET it), multiple cups of tea a day and my love for food, I’m getting through it. One of the things I always make sure I get enough of, especially when I’m stressed, is protein. Protein is needed every day, but even more so when you are stressed. If you are like me, prone to anxiety and insomnia when stressed, ensuring you get lots of protein (along with plenty of fresh vegetables) can be just another way to help your body cope with stress because protein is used for the production of the hormones (neurotransmitters) that calm you down, make you happy and help you sleep.

Let’s talk about protein and amino acids

I’ve noticed lately that a lot of very well-meaning bloggers and vloggers out there in the interwebs/blogosphere that are trying to inspire their followers to be healthy (which I think is fabulous, by the way) are just a tad ill-informed when they are trying to demonstrate why a food is particularly healthy: “It’s full of protein and amino acids”. Now, I’m not trying to be a perfectionist and talk these people down (it’s just not my style), but as a health practitioner I can’t help but want to educate as many people as I can about the basics. The statement isn’t exactly untrue, but when you know the basics of nutrition, it does sound a tad repetitive. Continue reading

Ginger & Lime Molasses Cookies

It’s finally time, today is my very last day of my degree, and I feel the need to pinch myself because I cannot believe it is true. It’s been 4 1/2 years, 9 semesters, 1 summer class, 2 campuses, 9 clinics and countless friendships with some of the most amazing people I’ve met. I can’t wait to get out there and share my passion for wellness and the knowledge I’ve gained with you all – I’m just so excited!!

So to celebrate, I’d like to share with you, the cookie recipe I made for my last day celebrations – Ginger & Lime Molasses Cookies.

ginger and lime molasses cookies

These cookies are chewy and incredibly filling, in fact, after just one, despite their deliciousness, you likely will not be able to eat a second one. They are sugar free, so if you have a bit of a sweet tooth, they will take some getting used to, but the flavour is so rich and has so much depth, they make a good treat for anyone having too much sugar.

Black strap molasses is a lovely source of iron and B vitamins, great for energy production and brain function, while the oats have a fibre called beta-glucan which bind to cholesterol in the gut and excretes it, which can lower your cholesterol levels if they are high.

cookie tray

Ginger & Lime Molasses Cookies

(Makes 30 cookies)

Ingredients

125g butter, softened

1 cup black strap molasses

2-3cm fresh ginger, grated

2tsp cinnamon

Zest of 2 limes

900g rolled oats, blended in batches into a flour consistency

2tsp baking soda

Juice of 1/2 lime

Directions

Preheat the oven to 180 degrees Celsius and prepare two oven trays, lining them with baking paper.

In a large bowl, mix butter, molasses, cinnamon, lime zest and ginger until all of the lumps are gone and everything is thoroughly mixed. Add 1/4 of the oat flour and baking soda and combine. Add the lime juice and another 1/4 of the oat flour, and mix. Add the third quarter and combine. Finally, using your hands to knead the dough, add the last 1/4 of oat flour bit by bit until the mixture is no longer sticky, but not too dry.

Grabbing small handfuls of the mixture at a time, shape the dough into round discs, about 3cm wide and 1cm thick. Place these on the oven trays 1-2cm apart.

Bake each tray for around 10 minutes. Cool for 10 minutes on the tray and transfer to a cooling rack.

 

These cookies are a fantastic treat for morning or afternoon tea and because they have no added sugar, they are low GI, which means the energy is slow release, so you wont have an energy slump later on after eating them, and because they are so filling, you are unlikely to overeat.